Edamame: A food that sounds like a video game/Recipes/Kosher

There was a time not so long ago that the soy bean was an ingredient that was relegated to the soy sauce or tofu ingredient in our recipes. Some enterprising chef realized that the soy bean in its fresh form AKA Edamame is a fabulous food in its own natural form and voila, a new food craze is off and running.

Edamame (or the soy bean) is a green vegetable that is jam packed full of protein and is a wonderful source for calcium, magnesium, riboflavin, thiamin, foliate and iron. These large beans come in a pod that looks like a pea pod only bigger. They are harvested early in their growth cycle so the beans are still tender and green and haven’t matured. The best way to use the edamame is to parboiled in lightly salted water, rinse, drain and cool and then remove the bean from the pod. When shopping for your fresh edamame choose pods that are plump, firm and don’t have any spots of blemishes. You can keep the fresh edamame in the refrigerator for 4 or 5 days and the frozen stuff is just fine for 3 or 4 months in the freezer.

Edamame is so very versatile it’s great eaten all by itself or in salads, soups, stir fry, pasta dishes and any kind of casseroles into which you want to add some protein.  Fresh edamame is usually found at natural and higher end produce sections or at farmers markets. You can find the frozen stuff in most grocery freezer sections.

At this point you know as much as I do about our friend the edamame and you’re ready to try some of the new recipes you’ll find below.

 

HOISIN BEEF AND EDAMAME (meat)

 

1/2 lb cooked and drained whole wheat spaghetti

3 tablespoons lime juice

3 tablespoons hoisin sauce

1 tablespoon minced garlic

1 teaspoon cornstarch

2 teaspoons sesame oil

8 ounces  steak, trimmed, thinly sliced

1 red bell pepper, thinly sliced

1 10-ounce package frozen shelled edamame, (about 2 cups), thawed

1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger

1/2 cup chopped fresh cilantro or parsley

 

In a bowl combine the lime juice, hoisin sauce, garlic and cornstarch. Whisk to combine.

Heat the oil in a large skillet and add the steak and cook, stirring occasionally for about 2 minutes or until it’s done the way you like it. Immediately transfer the steak to a plate using tongs but don’t clean the pan. Add bell pepper to in the pan and cook, stirring, for 1 minute. Add edamame and cook until heated through, about 2 minutes. Add ginger and cook, stirring, until fragrant, about 30 seconds. Add the sauce mixture and beef to the pan. Cook, stirring, until the sauce is thickened, about 1 minute. Remove from the heat. Add the noodles; toss to coat. Top with cilantro. Serves 4

 

Tip: Freezing the flank steak for about 20 minutes will make it easier to thinly slice.

 

From EatingWell January/February 2007

GARLIC EDAMAME (pareve)

 

1/2 cup water

6 cloves garlic, minced

2 (16 ounce) packages frozen edamame

1/2 cup teriyaki or soy sauce

1/4 cup brown sugar

1/4 cup rice vinegar

2 tablespoons sesame oil

1/4 cup sesame seeds

1/2 to 1 lb angel hair pasta, cooked, drained

 

Bring the water and garlic to a boil in a saucepan over high heat. Stir in the edamame, and cook until the edamame are hot, and the liquid has nearly evaporated, about 5 minutes. Reduce the heat to medium and stir in the teriyaki sauce, brown sugar, vinegar, and sesame oil. Stir constantly until the sauce has thickened and coats the edamame, about 4 minutes. Add the cooked pasta, toss to combine and place the mixture in a serving bowl. Sprinkle the top with sesame seeds and serve. Serves 6 as a side dish 4 as a main course.

 

Submitted by Jore Cardase Chicago IL

EDAMAME AND CORN SALAD (pareve)

 

1 package (16 ounces) frozen shelled edamame

2 cups fresh or frozen corn, cooked and kernels

1 medium red bell pepper, coarsely chopped

4 green onions, thinly sliced

4 stalks celery, chopped

1/2 cup chopped black olives

1/4 cup chopped fresh parsley

 

dressing:

 

1/4 cup olive oil

1/4 cup rice wine vinegar

1 teaspoon sugar

1 small tomato, seeded and diced small

1 tablespoon oregano

1 teaspoon minced garlic

1 teaspoon salt

1/4 teaspoon black pepper

 

 

Bring 2 quarts water to boil in medium saucepan on high heat. Add edamame; cook 4 minutes or until edamame are bright green and tender. Drain and rinse under cold water. For the dressing, combine all the ingredients in a large salad bowl and whisk to combine.  Add edamame, corn, red bell pepper, green onions, celery, black olives and parsley; toss well to coat. Cover and refrigerate at least 1 hour to blend flavors. Toss before serving.

 

Modified by me from mccormick.com

 

SESAME CHICKEN EDAMAME (meat)

 

2 teaspoons oil

1 tablespoon minced peeled fresh ginger

2 teaspoons minced peeled fresh lemongrass

2 garlic cloves, minced

1 pound skinless, boneless chicken breast, cut into bite-sized pieces

2 cups frozen shelled edamame (green soybeans)

2 cups frozen bell pepper stir-fry mix

2 tablespoons  soy sauce

1 tablespoon mirin (sweet rice wine)

1 teaspoon dark sesame oil

1/4 teaspoon cornstarch

1/2 cup (1/4-inch) diagonally cut green onions

2 teaspoons dark sesame seeds

1/2 teaspoon salt

 

Heat the oil in a large skillet. Add the ginger, lemongrass, and garlic and sauté 1 minute or just until mixture begins to brown. Add the chicken and cook for about 2 minutes. Add edamame and stir-fry mix and cook, stirring constantly for about 3 minutes.  In a bowl combine the soy sauce, mirin, sesame oil, and cornstarch and whisk to combine. Add the liquid to the pan and cook for about 1 minute. Remove the pan from the heat and add the onions, sesame seeds, and salt. Mix to combine and serve over rice or noodles. Serves 6 to 8

 

Modified from Cooking Light MARCH 2006

 

PEPPERS EDAMAME AND QUINOA (pareve)

 

1 1/2 cup cooked quinoa

1 cup shelled frozen edamame, thawed

1 red bell pepper, seeded and chopped

1 red onion, chopped

3 stalks of celery, chopped

2/3 cup golden raisins

8 to 12 bib lettuce leaves

1/4 cup rice wine vinegar

2 tablespoons soy sauce

1 tablespoon honey

1 clove of garlic, minced

 

In a bowl combine the garlic, honey, soy sauce and vinegar. Whisk to combine and set aside.  In a large bowl combine the quinoa, edamame, pepper, raisins and onion and mix to combine.  Pour the sauce over the quinoa and mix together until the mixture is completely coated. To serve, place 2 leaves on each serving plate and spoon some of the quinoa mixture into it. Serves 4 to 6.

 

From my files, source unknown

 

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All In for Asparagus At Any Price/Some Recipes Not Kosher

So I walk into the produce section of my favorite green grocer and what do I spy? Why asparagus at .99 a pound. Are they kidding me? .99 a pound? Sign me up and shut the door, I’m all in for this special. As if in a daze my cart magically makes its way over to the stand and I find myself loading bundle after bundle of that sweet stalk of green goodness into my cart.

By the time I get out of my chlorophyll induced stupor I’m in my kitchen, the proud owner of 10 pounds of the stuff and no real plan on how to use it up before it starts to wilt. My plan, take a deep breath, do a little recipe research and cook up a storm.

Asparagus is one of Mother Nature’s finest gifts and is a sure sign that spring has sprung. It’s a part of the lily family and is sort of a first cousin to onions, leeks and garlic. Loaded with vitamins A, B and C it’s also a great source for folic acid,  It’s at its best from May through June so now is the best time to stock up and chow down. It is a very versatile vegetable that can be prepared by steaming, roasting, grilling or even stir frying it. The spears should be firm and green with tightly closed firm tips. Choose thin or thick stalks is just a matter of personal preference, I don’t really taste a difference between the two. Pass up asparagus with thick woody looking stalks.  I don’t peel the stalks but I do cut off about 1/2 inch of the ends before cooking.

If you’d like a little variety in your life look for white or purple asparagus. They’re the same as the green variety they’ve just been grown differently; the white is grown like some mushrooms, without light so it doesn’t produce chlorophyll. You will find that the white asparagus is a tad bit sweeter but so is the price point. The purple is pretty but it does loose most of its purple color when cooked.

I’ve started cooking and don’t plan on stopping until the last stalk is devoured and invite you to do the same with these terrific recipes

GRILLED ASPARAGUS CRAB TART

 

1lb. asparagus, cut into 1/3’s and grilled slightly

1/4 cup butter or margarine

4 to 5 portabella mushrooms chopped

1 tablespoon minced garlic

1/2 cup bread crumbs

3 tablespoon parmesan cheese, divided

1/2 teaspoon pepper

2 cups shredded Munster or pepper jack cheese

1/2 lb crabmeat shredded or chopped

8 ounces vegetable cream cheese

4 eggs

1 tablespoon fresh parsley, chopped or 2 teaspoons dried

 

Preheat oven to 375. Grease a 13×9-inch glass baking dish with cooking spray. In a skillet melt the butter. Add the mushrooms and cook, stirring frequently for about 6 or 7 minutes. Remove the mushrooms and garlic from the heat and add the bread crumbs, Parmesan cheese, and pepper.  Mix to combine and then press mushroom mixture evenly in bottom and up side of greased pan. Sprinkle the shredded cheese over the mushroom crust. Place the asparagus and crabmeat on top of the cheese. In a bowl of an electric mixer combine the cream cheese, eggs and 1 tablespoon of the parsley. Beat to combine and so that there are no lumps. Pour the egg mixture over the asparagus and crabmeat. Sprinkle the top with the 2 tablespoons of Parmesan cheese. Bake for 35 to 40 minutes or until the top is golden brown. Let cool for 5 to 10 minutes then serve. Serves 8.

 

PUFFED ASPARAGUS AND BACON BITES

 

1 lb fresh asparagus ends cut off, steamed till just crisp tender

1 package puff pastry dough (2 sheets), defrosted

1 cup shredded pepper jack or Swiss cheese

1/4 cup bacon, cooked and crumbled

1/4 cup green onion, finely chopped

2 tablespoons melted butter

1 tablespoon sesame seeds

 

Preheat oven to 400. Place a piece of parchment paper on a cookie sheet. Open puff pastry dough and cut each sheet into 1/3’s. Then cut each strip into 1/3’s. Roll each section out slightly so they form rectangles. On each section, lengthwise, place a few stalks of cooked asparagus on one edge, sprinkle some cheese, bacon and green onions on top of the asparagus and then roll them up. Place the rolls, seam side down on the cookie sheet. Brush the top of each roll with the melted butter and sprinkle the top with a few sesame seeds. Bake for 12 to 15 minutes or until roll ups are golden browned. Remove from the oven and let cool for 2 to 3 minutes. Cut each roll in half and serve. Serves 6 to 8.

ASPARAGUS POPOVERS

 

1 lb asparagus

2 tablespoons butter

1/2 cup milk

3 large eggs, at room temperature

1/2 cup flour

1/2 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon pepper

1 pinch sugar

3 ounces gruyere cheese, shredded

 

Preheat oven to 425. In a medium saucepan, add 2 inched of salted water; bring to a boil. Add the asparagus and cook until crisp-tender, about 3 minutes. Drain and rinse with cold water, then pat dry with paper towels. Cut the spears crosswise into thirds. In a medium cast-iron skillet, add the butter. Place the skillet in the oven to melt the butter. In a medium bowl, microwave the milk on high for 30 seconds. Whisk in the eggs, then the flour, salt, pepper, and sugar. Add the asparagus pieces to the hot cast-iron skillet and pour the batter on top. Sprinkle with half of the cheese and bake until puffed and golden-brown, 18 to 20 minutes. Top with the remaining cheese. Recipe makes 24 pieces

 

From the May 2008 issue of Everyday with Rachael Ray

ASPARAGUS TID BITS

 

1 lb asparagus cut into bite size pieces

1 tablespoon olive oil

1/2 lb smoked white fish, broken into bite size pieces

12 oz gruyere cheese, sliced

1 loaf French bread, sliced in to 1/2-inch slices

1/3 to 1/2 cup olive oil

kosher salt, to taste

pepper, to taste

 

Preheat oven to 350. Saute the asparagus in the olive oil until it’s just soft and set it aside. Line a cookie sheet with parchment paper. With a pastry brush, lightly brush the top of the slices of French bread with olive oil. Place the oiled pieces, oil side up on the parchment paper, season with salt and pepper. Bake for about 5 to 7 minutes until golden. Place a small piece of white fish on top of the toasted French bread, then put two to three pieces of asparagus, and top with one small slice of gruyere, Grind a little pepper on top, return to the oven for 2 minutes or just until the cheese melts. Serve immediately. Makes 12 to 14 pieces.

 

ASPARAGUS STRATA

You can vary the amount of cheese according to your taste

 

1 to 1 1/2 lbs. fresh asparagus, cut into bite size pieces

2 carrots shredded

1 to 2 tablespoon olive oil

Salt and pepper

6 tablespoons butter

1/3 cup flour

3 cups milk or 1/2 and 1/2

1/4 teaspoon grated nutmeg

3/4 cup grated parmesan cheese (for sauce)

1 tablespoon minced garlic

Salt and pepper

6 large par boiled lasagna noodles

1 to 1 1/3 cup shredded mozzarella cheese

3/4 to 1 cup grated Romano cheese

1/3 to 1/2 cup grated Parmesan cheese

 

Preheat oven to 425. Place the asparagus and shredded carrots on a cookie sheet with sides and toss them with the olive oil, salt and pepper. Roast for 8 to 10 minutes until they just begin to soften. Cool slightly and set them aside. In a large saucepan melt the butter and add the flour and whisk briskly and constantly until it’s combined. Cook for about 2 minutes whisking constantly. Add the milk and continue whisking and cooking until the sauce is thickened. Reduce the heat and add the nutmeg, 3/4 cup parmesan cheese and garlic. Stir until cheese is melted. Season with salt and pepper to taste. Remove sauce from the heat. In a 9 X 13 pan, spread a few tablespoons of the sauce on the bottom. Top with 3 noodles then top with 1/3 of the roasted asparagus and carrot mixture. Sprinkle a little parmesan Romano and mozzarella cheese over the top of the asparagus. Spoon 1/3 of the sauce over the cheese. Top with a layer of 3 lasagna noodles. Repeat the layers asparagus, cheese, sauce. Top the sauce on the top of the strata with the remaining cheeses. Bake for about 30 to 40 minutes or until the top is golden and the sides are bubbly. Let the cool for about 15 to 20 minutes before serving. Serves 8.

 

Submitted by Corrine Rasterty, Finley NJ

 

ASPARAGUS AND ONIONS HOT POT

 

1 lb of fresh asparagus, cut into bite size pieces

1 large onion, chopped into bite size pieces

1 tablespoon minced garlic

3 tablespoons of butter, divided

2 tablespoons of flour

1 cup of milk

1/2 cup cream cheese

1/2 teaspoon chili powder

1 teaspoon of salt

pepper to taste

1/2 cup shredded pepper jack cheese, shredded.

1 cup of panko bread crumbs

 

Preheat oven to 350. Grease a 2 quart baking dish. In a skillet melt 1 tablespoon of butter and saute the asparagus, garlic and onion until just slightly wilted. Put the mixture into the greased pan. In a saucepan, melt 2 tablespoons of butter, add the flour and stir until smooth. Add the milk and cook, stirring constantly until the mixture is thickened and smooth. Add the cream cheese, chili powder, salt and pepper to taste. Pour the sauce over the asparagus and onion mixture. Mix to combine. Sprinkle the top with the cheese and breadcrumbs. Bake uncovered for 35 to 40 minutes or until bubbly and the cheese is melted. Serves 6 to 8 as a side dish.

 

MAPLE GLAZED ASPARAGUS

 

1 pound fresh asparagus, trimmed

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 tablespoon kosher salt

1 teaspoon black pepper

Paprika

2 tablespoons maple syrup

 

Preheat oven to 450. Line the cookie sheet with foil. Place the asparagus spears on a rimmed cookie sheet. Drizzle the olive oil and maple syrup over the top. Toss to make sure all the spears are coated. Lightly sprinkle the asparagus with the paprika, salt and pepper. Roast the asparagus for 8 to 10 minutes then turn it over and cook for another 2 minutes. Serve

ASPARAGUS   AND PASTA SALAD

 

6 to 8   slices Canadian bacon or hickory smoked  bacon, cut into bite size pieces   2 tablespoons olive oil   1  onion, finely chopped

1 red   pepper chopped

1/2 lb   mushrooms, sliced   1 1/2 pounds asparagus, trimmed and cut on a long diagonal into   1/2-inch-thick slices   1 lb. bow tie pasta, cooked according to the package directions, save 1 cup   of the water used in cooking   1/2 cup grated parmesan cheese

Parmesan   for serving

 

Cook the   bacon in a fry pan until it’s crispy and brown. Drain on paper towels and   pour off half of the remaining fat. Saute the onion, mushrooms and red pepper   in the skillet for about 5 minutes. Add the asparagus and continue cooking   for 3 to 4 minutes. Season with salt and pepper. Add the drained pasta and   1/2 cup of the water to the vegetable mixture. Mix to combine, scraping the   bottom to remove the cooked on bits of vegetable. Cook for 1 minute and add   the remaining water and 1/2 cup parmesan. Mix to combine and cook for an   additional 2 minutes. Place the pasta mixture in a serving bowl, add the   cooked bacon and toss to combine. Serve with additional parmesan. Serves 6 to   8

Modified from an old Gourmet Magazine recipe

Oddles of Noodles /some non kosher recipes

When my son discovered that the money train AKA his parents credit card had left when he entered grad school he quickly discovered the joys of pasta, or more specifically, ramen noodles. Left to his own devices (and given his limited time to spend in the kitchen) this staple in his pantry would have been the entree of choice. I convinced him, though a little culinary magic, a few simple recipes and a $50 gift card to Kroger have to try a few different types of noodles to kick up his menu variety.

Created in China (not Italy as most people believe) noodles were an integral part of the Chinese diet from as early as 200 B.C There are several kinds of noodles in Chinese cuisine, mien noodles (egg), rice noodles, wheat noodles and bean noodles. In northernChina, wheat noodle are eaten more regularly than rice or rice noodles. Rice noodles are considered a southern Chinese staple. I told my son that while there were nice inexpensive “Americanized” alternatives to the Asian noodles (lets not forgetJapanhere) that the originals were actually tastier and more interesting.

The first noodle I introduced him to was the Soba noodle. A Soba noodle is made with wheat flour and buckwheat. It’s high in fiber and has a nutty full bodied flavor. The higher the buckwheat content the more expensive the noodle. Soba noodles are typically served in soups or with a plain with a dipping sauce. Less expensive alternative: whole wheat spaghetti or linguini.

He already knew about Ramen but for the uninformed, Ramen are thin and skinny curly dried egg noodles that are typically sold in an instant soup form. There is usually a packet of flavored instant soup powder in the package. My son has eaten it for years and has added veggies and left over chicken or turkey. There isn’t really a less expensive alternative as they are cheap cheap cheap but regular spaghetti noodles are pretty close.
Rice noodles are round or flat, thin and slightly translucent white noodles made from rice flour and water. They kinda have zero flavor of their own (just a great squishy texture) and they pair with just about any strong meat of fish flavor. You can substitute vermicelli, linguine, or fettuccine but it’s not really a close match.

Bean thread, cellophane or mung bean noodles are very thin noodles that are semi-transparent noodles made from the starch of mung beans. Bean threads become very slippery when cooked. Their subtle flavor is the perfect complement to any meat or fish dish. I would suggest rice noodles or vermicelli as a substitute but they are sort of a one of a kind noodle.

For most the tried and true method of cooking noodles is to boil the and then add them to the other ingredients, pour sauce over them or add ingredients to the pot they were cooked in. I really don’t have much to add to that for my column other than don’t over cook them and read the instructions on the package.

If possible try and buy fresh noodles as opposed to the dried variety. Fresh noodles should be soft but not limp, sticky, or brittle. Fresh will keep for 3 or 4 days in the refrigerator and for 1 month in the freezer. Dried noodles can be kept until just about the next ice age in a cool, dry, dark place.

One final “noodle note” those ‘chow mein’ found in most Chinese restaurants are an American invention so if you’re looking for “authentic” pass the up and get yourself the real stuff.

SLEEPING DRAGON NOODLE SALAD

 

1/4 cup sesame oil

1 tablespoon hot sauce

2 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce

1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice

2 1/2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar

2 1/2 tablespoons sugar

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

zest of 1 lemon

3/4 cup thinly sliced green onions

2 carrots julienned

1/4 cup chopped celery

4 radishes julienned

2 cups shredded Chinese cabbage

4 packages ramen egg noodles, cooked, rinsed and drained

2 tablespoons black or toasted sesame seeds

 

In a large salad bowl combine the sesame oil, hot sauce, soy sauce, lemon juice, vinegar, sugar, lemon zest, and salt. Whisk to combine. Add the noodles and toss to coat. Add shredded cabbage and toss to coat. Add the green onions, carrot, celery and radishes. Toss to combine and top with sesame seeds before serving. Serves 8.

 

SHRIMP NOODLE STIR FRY

 

2 teaspoon cornstarch

2 egg whites

1/3 to 1/2 lb shelled shrimp (raw) cut in half

3/4 lb noodles (any kind will work but I like soba noodle with this)

salt

3 tablespoons sesame oil

3 to 4 green onions cut into 1 inch pieces

2 tablespoons soy sauce

1/8 teaspoon ginger

1 1/2 tablespoon white wine

1 1/2 teaspoon sugar

1 teaspoon sesame oil

 

In a bowl mix the cornstarch and ginger with the egg white and whisk to combine. Add the shrimp and toss to coat. Set aside. Cook the noodles in boiling salted water for about 4 to 5 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold running water. Heat the 3 tablespoons sesame oil in a skillet. Add the green onion, and shrimp and stir fry for about 1 minute. Add the soy sauce, wine and sugar and mix to combine. Cook for about 1 minute. Add the noodles and mix to combine. Continue cooking for 2 to 3 minutes and just before you’re finished add 1 teaspoon sesame oil, cook for 30 seconds, stirring constantly and serve. Serves then add the sesame seed oil just before serving. Serves 2 to 4

 

Modified from a recipe submitted by Carlie Smyth Chicago IL

HOT AND SPICEY PORTABELLA AND EDAMAME WITH NOODLES
For sauce
1/3 cup water
1/3 cup soy sauce
2 teaspoons Wasabi paste (this is hot, you can use less)
1 tablespoon brown sugar

1/4 cup oil
2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger
1 tablespoon minced garlic
10 ounces portabella mushrooms, chopped into small pieces
8 cups shredded Napa cabbage
6 green onions, thinly sliced
8 to 9 ounces soba
1 cup frozen shelled edamame

3 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds

 

In a bowl combine the water, soy sauce, Wasabi and brown sugar and whisk until the sugar is dissolved. Set the sauce aside.  Heat the oil in skillet then add the ginger and garlic and cook for about 30 seconds. Add the portabellas and saute, stirring frequently for 3 to 4 minutes. Reduce the heat and add cabbage and 2/3’s of the green onions (save a tablespoon for garnish) and cook, stirring occasionally, until cabbage is crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Add the sauce and simmer 2 minutes.

 

While cabbage is cooking, cook the soba and edamame together in a pasta pot of boiling salted water until the noodles are just tender, about 5 minutes. Drain the noodles and edamame in a colander and rinse with cool water. Place the noodles and edamame in a large bowl and add the vegetable mixture. Mix to combine. Serve sprinkled with remaining green onions and toasted sesame seeds.

 

BOTH SIDES BROWNED NOODLES

Kind of like a noodle pancake

1 pound fresh or dried egg noodles

2 tablespoon sesame oil

2 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil (or more if needed)

 

In a large stock pot, add enough water to cover the noodles and bring the water to a boil. Add the noodles, stirring to separate. Cook until the noodles almost done, tender, but still firm. Drain and rinse thoroughly. Place the noodles back into the pot and add the sesame oil and toss to coat. In a frying pan or a wok, heat 2 tablespoons oil over a high heat. Add the noodles. Spread the noodles out to the edges of the pan, and then let them cook, without stirring, until they are browned on the bottom (6 to 8 minutes). Flip over and brown the other side. You can do this by placing a plate over the top of the pan, flipping the noodles out onto it and then sliding them back into the pan. You may need to add a little more oil to keep them from sticking. Cook on the second side until crispy,4 to 5more minutes. Remove the fried noodle pancake to a serving plate.  Cut into wedges and serve with stir fried vegetables or grilled meat. Serves 4 to 6.

 

Submitted byTony Easteron River GroveIL

 

WARM GINGER AND PEANUT NOODLE SALAD

 

1/4 cup peanut butter

1/4 cup soy sauce

1 tablespoon rice vinegar

1 tablespoon fresh lime juice

1 1/2 teaspoons sesame oil

1 teaspoon wasabi

2 teaspoons minced garlic

1/2 teaspoon ginger

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 pound uncooked angle hair pasta or linguini

1 1/2 cups shredded carrot

1/3 to 1/2 pound snow peas, trimmed and halved crosswise

1 cup thin strips red or yellow bell pepper

3/4 cup thinly sliced green onions

1 can sliced water chestnuts

1/2 to 3/4 cup honey roasted peanuts

 

In a large bowl combine the peanut butter, soy sauce, vinegar, lime juice, sesame oil, Wasabi and garlic. Whisk to combine and set aside. Cook the pasta according to the directions on the box. When the noodles are al dente (still a little crunchy) turn off the heat and add the carrot and snow peas. Let the mixture sit for 2 minutes then drain, saving 1/4 cup of the liquid. Add the drained pasta and noodles to the salad dressing in the salad bowl. Toss to coat. Add the bell pepper, water chestnuts and onions. Toss to coat. Add the pasta water and toss to coat. Sprinkle the honey roasted peanuts on top and serve warm. Serves 4. This recipe can be doubled or tripled

 

SPICY CASHEW NOODLE SALAD

 

8 oz dried linguini, spaghetti, or soba noodles

2 cups broccoli florets cut small

1/4 pound pea pods, sliced in 1/3’s

1 carrot, peeled, julienned

1/2 red onion chopped fine

3 tablespoons sesame oil

2 to 3 teaspoons minced garlic

1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger

2 tablespoon soy sauce

3 tablespoons lime juice (fresh is best)

1/8 teaspoon cayenne

1/2 teaspoon paprika

2 tablespoon chopped fresh basil

3 green onions, sliced

1 large tomato seeded and chopped

1/2 cup red pepper, julienned

1 cup toasted cashews

 

Cook noodles according to package directions. Drain, rinse and drain again and then set it aside. Steam the broccoli, pea pods, and carrots for about 2 minutes, making sure they are still crisp. Rinse them in cold water and set them aside. Heat 1 tablespoon of the sesame oil in a frying pan, add onion, ginger and garlic and saute for 2 to 3 minutes until just soft. Add the green onions, tomato and red pepper. Mix to combine and cook for about 2 minutes. In a bowl combine the lime juice, remaining 2 tablespoons sesame oil, soy sauce. Add the sauteed onion mixture to the sauce and mix to combine. Add the noodles and steamed vegetables to the sauce. Toss to coat the pasta. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour before serving. Great at room temperature or served cold. Before serving sprinkle the pine nuts on the top. Serves 6.

 

SALSA SHRIMP AND NOODLE SOUP

 

1 lb shrimp, peeled and divined

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1/4 teaspoon chili powder

1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

5 cups water

2 packages shrimp flavored Ramen Noodles (use 1 packet of seasoning)

2 cups salsa

1 15 oz can black beans rinsed and drained

1 can corn

1 green onion thinly sliced

 

In a medium bowl combine the lemon juice chili powder, cumin, and pepper. Mix to combine and add the shrimp. Toss to coat and let sit for 1/2 hour. In a large sauce pan bring water to boil, stir in 1 ramen flavor packet, break the ramen noodles into pieces and add them to the saucepan. Bring the liquid to a boil cook for 1 minute. Add shrimp, salsa, beans, corn, and green onion and then reduce the soup to a simmer. Cook for 5 to 7 minutes or until the shrimp turns pink. Serves 4.

 

Submitted by Lenore Hentz Trenton NJ

 

ASPARAGUS AND NOODLE STIR FRY

 

3 oz. pkg. oriental or shrimp flavor ramen noodle soup mix

1 tablespoon sesame oil

1 lb. asparagus, cut into 1″ pieces

1 red bell pepper, cut into strips

1 red onion, chopped

2 teaspoons minced garlic

1 lb. sea scallops cut in half

1 tablespoon soy sauce

2 tablespoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon sesame oil

1/8 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

 

Cook and drain ramen noodles as directed on the package and set them aside. Heat 1 tablespoon sesame oil in wok or large skillet. Add the asparagus, bell pepper, onion and garlic. Stir fry for 2 to 3 minutes or until the vegetables are crisp-tender. Add the scallops and stir-fry until they are white and firm. Add the ramen seasoning packet, soy sauce, lemon juice, 1 teaspoon sesame oil and hot sauce and stir into scallop mixture. Stir in the cooked noodles. Cook for 3 or 4 minutes until everything is hot throughout. Serves 4 to 6.

 

Modified from about.com

Superbowl Update: We Dip, We Eat and Everybody Wins

Ok sports fans, it’s the end of the first quarter, the bases are loaded, one more goal and it’s a hat trick and the quarterback takes the snap. He runs down the court, the clock is ticking, ticking, ticking 5,4,3, 2…………he shoots, he scores and………………he was fouled!!! In my dyslexic world of sport this is how I see this Super Bowl being played.

Yes, surprising to most who know me, I’m a sports fan, sort of. It’s time for the annual Super bowl, you know that the annual game of who out lasted whom in the different football leagues (do they still have leagues don’t they?) or as it is less commonly known, the high holy day of chips and dips.

In keeping with the sports metaphors, dare I say puns, I feel are in keeping with the day, it’s a pretty much the same set up every year (only the players (re: guests) and game plan (recipes) change. Appetizers until half time and then sandwiches. Victory desserts after the game. This game plan gives everyone the ability to be “on the field” eating all day long and yet not feel as if they were not going to be benched for a foul like double dipping your chip or failing to stop passage of the “special” punch to an underage illegal receiver.

The following recipes are all winners no matter which team you’re rooting for to bring home the Turner Cup. It is the Turner Cup isn’t it?

HOT ARTICHOKE DIP

1 can (14 ounce) artichoke hearts, drained

1 cup mayonnaise

1 cup freshly grated parmesan cheese

2 teaspoon minced garlic (or to taste), minced

1 tablespoon fresh lemon juice

1/2 teaspoonTabascosauce or other red pepper sauce (optional)

Preheat oven to 350. Coarsely chop the artichoke hearts, and combine with all other ingredients. Stir to mix well. Spoon mixture into a 9-inch pie plate.

Bake in preheated oven for about 20 minutes, until lightly browned. Serve with assorted crackers, bread, or other dippers. Makes about 12 servings.

HOT CRAB DIP

6 tablespoons mayonnaise

3 tablespoons Creole mustard

1 tablespoon horseradish cream

2 teaspoons Old Bay Seasoning

1/4 cup minced celery

1/4 cup minced onion

Tabascosauce, to taste

1 pound fresh crabmeat

1 cup coarsely crumbled cornbread (I use store bought)

Heat the oven to 400 and arrange a rack in middle. Place mayonnaise, mustard, horseradish cream,OldBay, celery, and onion in a small bowl and mix until well combined. Season with salt andTabascosauce, add crab, and mix until well incorporated. Place crab mixture in a 3-cup ovenproof dish and top with crumbled cornbread. Bake in the oven until golden brown, about 15 minutes. Serve immediately with toasts or celery sticks. Serves 8 to 10.

Submitted by Bettie Aldich-WagnerOak ParkIL

BROWN SUGAR DIP

1 3/4 cups firmly packed brown sugar
1 cup butter
1 cup whipping cream
1 cup pecans, toasted
3 pounds pears, cored and sliced
3 pounds apples, cored and sliced

Combine first 4 ingredients in a heavy saucepan; cook over medium heat until butter melts, stirring occasionally. Reduce heat and simmer 12 to 15 minutes, stirring occasionally. Serve with pear and apple slices. Serves 12 to 14.

HOT PIZZA DIP

8 ounces cream cheese, softened
1 teaspoon Italian seasoning
1 cup (4 ounces) shredded mozzarella cheese
3/4 cup (3 ounces) shredded Parmesan cheese
1 (8 ounce) can pizza sauce
2 tablespoons chopped green bell pepper
2 tablespoons sliced green onion

Heat oven to 350. In a bowl, combine cream cheese and Italian seasoning; mix well. Spread mixture in the bottom of a medium-size casserole dish. Combine mozzarella and Parmesan cheeses. Sprinkle half of the cheese mixture over cream cheese. Spread pizza sauce over cheese. Top with remaining cheese, pepper and onions. Bake for 15 to 18 minutes or until bubbly. Serves 12. Can be heated in the microwave.

HOT BRIE DIP

2 tablespoons butter
1 medium onion, chopped fine
2 teaspoons garlic, minced
8 ounces Brie cheese, trimmed and cut into pieces
8 ounces cream cheese
3/4 cup sour cream
2 tablespoons lemon juice
2 teaspoons brown sugar
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce salt and pepper to taste
1 (8 ounce) round bread loaf

Heat oven to 400. Saute onion and garlic in butter until golden. Set aside. Put Brie and cream cheese in a bowl and microwave until soft. Mix in onion and garlic, sour cream, lemon juice, brown sugar and Worcestershire sauce; season to taste with salt and pepper. Hollow out the middle of the loaf and fill with mixture. Wrap in foil and bake in oven until bubbly, approximately 20 to 30 minutes. Dust with paprika if desired. Serve hot with bread pieces or crackers. Makes 2 cups.

 

HOT RUBIN DIP
4 tablespoons butter or margarine
1 large onion, finely diced
1/2 pound corned beef, sliced and shredded
1 (8 ounce) package cream cheese
1 1/2 cups sauerkraut, drained and chopped fine
2 tablespoons sweet pickle relish
2 tablespoons dill pickle relish
1/2 cup ketchup
1/2 cup mayonnaise
2 cups grated Swiss cheese

Melt butter or margarine in a 4-quart sauce pot. Add diced onion and cook until golden brown. Add corned beef and cook for 3 minutes, stirring often over medium heat. Drain excess fat. Add cream cheese in chunks, stirring after each addition. Add sauerkraut and pickle relish. Add ketchup, mayonnaise and Swiss cheese. Stir until well blended and melted. Serve in fondue pot or chafing dish with toasted mini rye triangles. Serves 6 to 8.

From an old SUNSET Magazine in my files.

SPINACH BACON DIP

1/2 cup pecans
1 pound fresh spinach, stemmed, 8 oz. frozen, thawed and drained
8 slices bacon
1 cup (8 ounces) sour cream
3 ounces cream cheese, softened to room temperature
1/3 cup mayonnaise
1 tablespoon minced pickled jalapenos
1 teaspoon Worcestershire sauce
1/2 teaspoon salt, or to taste

Heat the oven to 300. Spread the pecans in a cake pan and toast them until lightly browned, 10 to 12 minutes. Cool, and then coarsely chop the nuts. Set aside.

Wash the spinach well. Drain the spinach and immediately transfer the damp leaves to a large pot set over high heat. Cover and cook until the leaves are just wilted, 3 to 4 minutes. Strain and let stand until cool. Squeeze the spinach and dry on paper towels. Chop very fine and set aside. In a saute pan, fry the bacon over until crisp, about 12 to 15 minutes. Drain on paper towels, then cut each slice crosswise into half-inch pieces. Set aside.

In a mixing bowl, combine the sour cream, cream cheese and mayonnaise, and mix with a wooden spoon until smooth. Add the spinach and jalapenos and mix well. Stir in the pecans and bacon. Add the Worcestershire sauce and salt and mix well. Taste and adjust the seasoning. Cover and refrigerate the dip for at least 1 hour. Bring it to room temperature before serving. Serves 12.

BUFFALO CHICKEN WING DIP

1 can chicken (large size)
1 8 oz. package cream cheese
1/2 cup blue cheese dressing
1/4 cup cayenne pepper sauce
1 cup shredded Monterrey Jack cheese
celery sticks, crackers or corn chips

Preheat oven to 350. Melt cream cheese over low heat. Once creamy, add blue cheese dressing, hot sauce, and chicken. Remove from heat, fold in 1/2 cup of shredded cheese. Pour into square 8×8 oven-safe dish. Top with remaining cheese. Bake until cheese is melted and bubbly. Serve with celery sticks, crackers or corn chips.

Submitted by Carlos RaminezNY,NY

NAUGHTY NACHO CHEESE DIP

1/2 cup beer

1 teaspoon ground cumin

1/2 teaspoon dried oregano

1/2 teaspoon garlic powder

1 16-ounce can refried beans

1/2 cup purchased chunky hot salsa

2 cups shredded sharp Cheddar cheese

1/4 cup chopped fresh cilantro

Tortilla chips

In a saucepan combine the beer, cumin, dried oregano and garlic powder. Bring to simmer. Add beans and salsa; stir until heated through. Add cheese; stir until cheese melts, about 3 minutes. Stir in cilantro. Transfer to bowl. Serve warm with tortilla chips. Makes about 4 cups

Make Mine Minestrone

While chicken soup may be the quintessential soup to serve when someone is sick and tomato soup is the perfect comfort food to serve with a grilled cheese sandwich (extra cheese please) Minestrone is the one I like to serve best on a cool crisp fall evening when there is just a hint of frost in the air and I’m ready to light the first bonfire of the season. Minestrone is an Italian soup in origin, made with fresh seasonally fall vegetables, often made more robust with the addition of pasta or rice.

The most common ingredients of Minestrone soup include beans (dry and/or canned), onions, celery, carrots, stock, and tomatoes. There is no one “politically correct” recipe for minestrone  since it is usually made out of whatever vegetables are in season or in your fridge it can whipped together (and thrown in a crockpot ) relativity quickly before you head out for the day and ready when you get home or cooked the night before and reheated . It can also be vegetarian or contain meat. In fact the word “minestrone” has become a synonym for “throw what every you like in there”. Just so you know, great minestrone should distinguish itself by the large quantity of fresh vegetables it contains and its thick consistency (great for mopping up with that extra bread that always seems to be on the table when you serve a thick soup).

MINESTRONE OF MODENA (meat)

 

1/2 cup dried cannellini beans
1/3 to 1/2 cup olive oil
3 ounces sliced pastrami, chopped
1 cup minced yellow onions
1/2 cup minced celery
1/2 cup minced carrots
1 generous tablespoon chopped flat-leaf parsley
1 (14.5 ounce) can tomatoes, drained
2 medium boiling potatoes, peeled and diced
4 ounces green beans, cut into 1/2-inch pieces
2 medium zucchini, diced
4 ounces white mushrooms, diced
2 cups shredded Savoy cabbage
4 ounces asparagus, diced
1 cup fresh or frozen petite green peas
8 to 10 basil leaves, shredded
2 quarts warm water or canned low-sodium chicken broth
Salt and freshly ground black pepper

Sort beans, pick out the bad ones and soak overnight in water to cover.

Heat oil in large pot over medium heat. Add pastrami, onions, celery, carrots, and parsley; cook, stirring until vegetables are lightly golden and soft, 8 to 10 minutes. Add tomatoes and stir, about 5 minutes. Drain and add the rehydrated cannellini beans, potatoes, green beans, zucchini, mushrooms, cabbage, asparagus, peas, and basil to the pot. Season with salt and pepper and stir for 2 to 3 minutes to coat vegetables well with savory base. Add warm water and Parmesan rind; bring to a boil. Reduce heat to low, partially cover, and simmer, stirring from time to time, for 2 to 2 1/2 hours, until the minestrone has a dense, thick consistency. (If the soup should thicken too much, add a bit more water.) Remove cheese rind, and adjust seasoning. Turn off heat and let soup stand for about 30 minutes. Serves 8 to 10

 

Note: Rice or small pasta such as ditalini can be added to the soup during the last minutes of cooking. Add rice 10 minutes before you turn off the heat, pasta 3 to 5 minutes before. The rice or pasta will keep cooking as the soup rests.

 

Adapted from Biba’s Taste of Italy. 2001. Biba Caggiano, William Morrow Publishing

 

FAST AND EASY MINESTRONE (meat)
1 (10 ounce) package frozen spinach, thawed
1 1/2 pounds lean ground beef
1/3 cup dry breadcrumbs
1 egg
Salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
2 tablespoons vegetable oil
1 large onion, coarsely chopped
7 cups beef or chicken or vegetable broth
1 (14.5 ounce) can whole tomatoes, mashed with a spoon
1 (15.5 ounce) can kidney beans
1/2 teaspoon dried oregano
1/2 teaspoon crumbled dried basil leaves
1 cup sliced carrots
1 cup sliced celery
1 cup uncooked rotelli pasta (4 ounces)

Squeeze as much moisture as possible from spinach. Mix together with beef, breadcrumbs, egg, salt, and pepper. Shape into 1-inch balls. Heat oil in Dutch oven over medium heat until very hot. Add a few meatballs and brown on all sides. Remove with slotted spoon and set aside to drain on paper towels. Repeat till all are browned.

 

Remove excess oil and add onion to Dutch oven; cook until opaque. Stir in broth, tomatoes, beans, oregano, and basil. Cover and simmer for 10 minutes. Add carrots and celery; cover and simmer for 10 minutes more. Stir in pasta; cover and simmer until done, about 10 minutes. Add meatballs and heat through, about 5 minutes. Ladle into soup bowls. Serves 10 to 12

VEGETARIAN MINESTRONE (pareve)

 

2 tablespoons olive oil
1/2 large onion, diced
1/2 large sweet potato, diced
2 medium white potatoes, diced
3 stalks celery
1/2 cup frozen peas
2 carrots, chopped
1 cup frozen corn
15 oz. canned whole tomatoes
6 cups water, boiling
Salt and pepper
Fresh or dried oregano, to taste

1/4 lb rottini pasta, cooked and drained

Parmesan cheese, optional

 

Saute the onion in the olive oil, until golden. Add the sweet potato, white potatoes, celery, peas, carrots, and corn and sauté until softened. Add tomatoes, breaking up with hands or spoon. Add boiling water, salt and pepper and simmer for 15 to 20 minutes.  In the last minutes of cooking add the cooked pasta to the soup.  Ladle into bowls, garnish with cheese and oregano if desired. Serves 6.

 

VERY VEGGIE MINESTRONE (pareve or meat)

 

1/4 cup olive oil
1 onion, coarsely chopped
1 tablespoon minced garlic (more if you prefer)

2 stalks celery

1 red pepper, seeded and diced into chunks
4 oz prewashed and cut kale (6 cups)
1 (1-lb) bag frozen mixed Italian vegetables such as zucchini, green beans, cauliflower, and broccoli
1 (14 1/2-oz) can “petite” diced tomatoes in juice
1 cup elbow macaroni
5 1/4 cups chicken or vegetable broth (42 fl oz)
2 cups water
3/4 teaspoon salt
1/2 teaspoon black pepper
1 (19-oz) can cannellini beans, rinsed and drained
grated parmesan, optional

 

Heat oil in a 5- to 6-quart heavy pot over moderately high heat until hot but not smoking, then cook onion and garlic, stirring occasionally, until golden, about 3 minutes. Add kale and sauté, stirring, 1 minute. Add frozen vegetables, peppers, celery, tomatoes with juice, pasta, broth, water, salt, and pepper and simmer, uncovered, stirring occasionally, until vegetables are tender and pasta is al dente, about 10 minutes.

Meanwhile, transfer half of beans to a wide shallow bowl and coarsely mash with a fork or a potato masher, then stir mashed and whole beans into soup and simmer, stirring occasionally, until soup is slightly thickened, about 5 minutes. Season with salt and pepper.

 

Modified from a recipe from epicurious.com

 

MEATBALL MINESTRONE (meat or pareve)

 

1 cup frozen chopped onion

2 teaspoons minced garlic

1 tablespoon olive oil

1 (15- to 19-ounce) can cannellini beans, undrained

4 cups chicken or vegetable broth

1 (1.4-ounce) package dry vegetable soup mix

1 (16-ounce) package frozen cooked meatballs or vegetarian meatballs

2 (14 1/2-ounce) cans Italian-style diced tomatoes

1/2 teaspoon crushed red pepper

1 cup elbow pasta, uncooked

1 (10-ounce) package fresh washed baby spinach

 

In a large saucepan over medium-high heat, cook the onion and the garlic in the olive oil until the onion is tender, about 5 minutes. Stir in the beans and chicken broth and bring to a boil. Stir in vegetable soup mix until dissolved. Add meatballs, tomatoes and crushed red pepper and return to a boil. Add elbow macaroni and cook, stirring often, for 15 minutes or until pasta are tender.

Add the spinach and stir until it is wilted, about 1 minute. Serves 6.

 

MINESTRONE PASTA BOWL (dairy)

Not technically a soup but hey, it’s close and it’s really delicious so who cares what you call it.
1 package (16 ounces) uncooked rigatoni pasta
2 tablespoons olive oil, divided
2 teaspoons Italian Seasoning Mix, divided
1 large zucchini, sliced
1 large carrot, chopped
8 ounces mushrooms, sliced
2 garlic cloves, pressed
1 jar (26 ounces) spaghetti sauce
1 can (15 ounces) garbanzo beans, drained and rinsed
1/4 cup (1 ounce) grated fresh Parmesan cheese

Cook pasta according to package and drain. Return pasta to stockpot; add 1
tablespoon of the oil and 1 teaspoon of the seasoning mix, stirring to
coat. Cover and keep warm.

Meanwhile Heat remaining oil in skillet over medium heat until hot. Add garlic stir-fry 1 minute.  Add zucchini and carrot; stir-fry 2-3 minutes or until vegetables are crisp-tender. Add mushrooms, spaghetti sauce, garbanzo beans and remaining seasoning mix. Cook, stirring occasionally, 5-6 minutes or until sauce is bubbly and heated through. Transfer pasta to a large bowl. Carefully pour sauce over pasta. Grate Parmesan cheese over pasta. Serve immediately. 8 servings

 

SIMPLE MINESTRONE FOR FOUR (meat)

2 cups chicken stock
1 cup water
1 large potato, finely diced
3 garlic cloves, thinly sliced
2 medium zucchinis, grated
One 8 3/4-ounce can red kidney beans, drained
1/4 teaspoon kosher salt
1/4 teaspoon fresh ground pepper
Pinch of dried red pepper flakes
olive oil for drizzling
Combine the chicken stock, water, potato and garlic in a large saucepan. Bring to a boil over medium heat and cook until the potato becomes tender, about 15 minutes. Using a spoon or large fork, mash the potato slightly. Add the zucchini and kidney beans; cook until the beans are heated, 3 to 5 minutes. Add the salt, pepper and crushed red pepper. Divide among four soup bowls and drizzle a small amount of extra virgin olive oil over each serving. Serves 4
AUTUMN VEGETABLE MINESTRONE (pareve)

2 (14.5 oz) cans vegetable broth
1 (18 oz) can crushed tomatoes — undrained
3 medium carrots — chopped
3 small zucchini — cut into 1/2″ slices
1 medium yellow bell pepper — cut into 1/2″ pieces
8 medium green onions — sliced
2 cloves garlic — finely chopped
2 cups shredded cabbage
2 teaspoons dried marjoram
1 teaspoon salt
1/4 teaspoon pepper
1 cup uncooked instant rice
1/4 cup chopped fresh basil
Mix all ingredients except rice and basil in a 3 1/2 to 6 quart slow cooker. Cover and cook on low heat setting for 6 to 8 hours or until vegetables are tender. Stir in rice. Cover and cook on low heat setting for about 15 minutes or until rice is tender. Serves 6.

Oodles of Noodles

When my son discovered that the money train AKA his parents credit card had left when he entered grad school he quickly discovered the joys of pasta, or more specifically, ramen noodles. Left to his own devices (and given his limited time to spend in the kitchen) this staple in his pantry would have been the entree of choice. I convinced him, though a little culinary magic, a few simple recipes and a $50 gift card to Kroger have to try a few different types of noodles to kick up his menu variety.

Created in China (not Italy as most people believe) noodles were an integral part of the Chinese diet from as early as 200 B.C There are several kinds of noodles in Chinese cuisine, mien noodles (egg), rice noodles, wheat noodles and bean noodles. In northern China,
wheat noodle are eaten more regularly than rice or rice noodles. Rice noodles are considered a southern Chinese staple. I told my son that while there were nice inexpensive “Americanized” alternatives to the Asian noodles (lets not forget Japan here) that the originals were actually tastier and more interesting.

The first noodle I introduced him to was the Soba noodle. A Soba noodle is made with wheat flour and buckwheat. It’s high in fiber and has a nutty full bodied flavor. The higher the buckwheat content the more expensive the noodle. Soba noodles are typically served in soups or with a plain with a dipping sauce. Less expensive alternative: whole wheat spaghetti or linguini.

He already knew about Ramen but for the uninformed, Ramen are thin and skinny curly dried egg noodles that are typically sold in an instant soup form. There is usually a packet of flavored instant soup powder in the package. My son has eaten it for years and has added veggies and left over chicken or turkey. There isn’t really a less expensive alternative as they are cheap cheap cheap but regular spaghetti noodles are pretty close.

Rice noodles are round or flat, thin and slightly translucent white noodles made from rice flour and water. They kinda have zero flavor of their own (just a great squishy texture) and they pair with just about any strong meat of fish flavor. You can substitute vermicelli, linguine, or fettuccine but it’s not really a close match.

Bean thread, cellophane or mung bean noodles are very thin noodles that are semi-transparent noodles made from the starch of mung beans. Bean threads become very slippery when cooked. Their subtle flavor is the perfect complement to any meat or fish dish. I would suggest rice noodles or vermicelli as a substitute but they are sort of a one of a kind noodle.

For most the tried and true method of cooking noodles is to boil the and then add them to the other ingredients, pour sauce over them or add ingredients to the pot they were cooked in. I really don’t have much to add to that for my column other than don’t over cook them and read the instructions on the package.

If possible try and buy fresh noodles as opposed to the dried variety. Fresh noodles should be soft but not limp, sticky, or brittle. Fresh will keep for 3 or 4 days in the refrigerator and for 1 month in the freezer. Dried noodles can be kept until just about the next ice age in a cool, dry, dark place.

One final “noodle note” those ‘chow mein’ found in most Chinese restaurants are an American invention so if you’re looking for “authentic” pass the up and get yourself the real stuff. For those of you that don’t eat shell fish you can always substitute chicken or fish.

SLEEPING DRAGON NOODLE SALAD

1/4 cup sesame oil

1 tablespoon hot sauce

2 1/2 tablespoons soy sauce

1 1/2 tablespoons lemon juice

2 1/2 tablespoons rice wine vinegar

2 1/2 tablespoons sugar

1/2 teaspoon kosher salt

zest of 1 lemon

3/4 cup thinly sliced green onions

2 carrots julienned

1/4 cup chopped celery

4 radishes julienned

2 cups shredded Chinese cabbage

4 packages ramen egg noodles, cooked, rinsed and drained

2 tablespoons black or toasted sesame seeds

 

In a large
salad bowl combine the sesame oil, hot sauce, soy sauce, lemon juice, vinegar,
sugar, lemon zest, and salt. Whisk to combine. Add the noodles and toss to
coat. Add shredded cabbage and toss to coat. Add the green onions, carrot,
celery and radishes. Toss to combine and top with sesame seeds before serving.
Serves 8.

 

SHRIMP NOODLE STIR FRY

2 teaspoon cornstarch

2 egg whites

1/3 to 1/2 lb shelled shrimp (raw) cut in half

3/4 lb noodles (any kind will work but I like soba noodle with this)

salt

3 tablespoons sesame oil

3 to 4 green onions cut into 1 inch pieces

2 tablespoons soy sauce

1/8 teaspoon ginger

1 1/2 tablespoon white wine

1 1/2 teaspoon sugar

1 teaspoon sesame oil

 

In a bowl mix the cornstarch and ginger with the egg white and whisk to combine. Add the shrimp and toss to coat. Set aside. Cook the noodles in boiling salted water for about 4 to 5 minutes. Drain and rinse under cold running water. Heat the 3 tablespoons sesame oil in a skillet. Add the green onion, and shrimp and stir fry for about 1 minute. Add the soy sauce, wine and sugar and mix to combine. Cook for about 1 minute. Add the noodles and mix to combine. Continue cooking for 2 to 3 minutes and just before you’re finished add 1 teaspoon sesame oil, cook
for 30 seconds, stirring constantly and serve. Serves then add the sesame seed oil just before serving. Serves 2 to 4

Modified from a recipe submitted by Carlie Smyth Chicago IL

 

HOT AND SPICEY PORTABELLA AND EDAMAME WITH NOODLES

For sauce

1/3 cup water

1/3 cup soy sauce

2 teaspoons Wasabi paste (this is hot, you can use less)

1 tablespoon brown sugar

1/4 cup oil

2 tablespoons minced fresh ginger

1 tablespoon minced garlic

10 ounces portabella mushrooms, chopped into small pieces

8 cups shredded Napa cabbage

6 green onions, thinly sliced

8 to 9 ounces soba

1 cup frozen shelled edamame

3 tablespoons toasted sesame seeds

 

In a bowl combine the water, soy sauce, Wasabi and brown sugar and whisk until the sugar is dissolved. Set the sauce aside.  Heat the
oil in skillet then add the ginger and garlic and cook for about 30 seconds. Add the portabellas and saute, stirring frequently for 3 to 4 minutes. Reduce the heat and add cabbage and 2/3’s of the green onions (save a tablespoon for garnish) and cook, stirring occasionally, until cabbage is crisp-tender, about 5 minutes. Add the sauce and simmer 2 minutes.

 

While cabbage is cooking, cook the soba and edamame together in a pasta pot of boiling salted water until the noodles are just tender, about 5 minutes. Drain the noodles and edamame in a colander and rinse with cool water. Place the noodles and edamame in a large bowl and add the vegetable mixture. Mix to combine. Serve sprinkled with remaining green onions and toasted sesame seeds.

 

BOTH SIDES BROWNED NOODLES

Kind of like a noodle pancake

1 pound fresh or dried egg noodles

2 tablespoon sesame oil

2 tablespoons peanut or vegetable oil (or more if needed)

In a large stock pot, add enough water to cover the noodles and bring the water to a boil. Add the noodles, stirring to separate. Cook until the noodles almost done, tender, but still firm. Drain and rinse thoroughly. Place the noodles back into the pot and add the sesame oil and toss to coat. In a frying pan or a wok, heat 2 tablespoons oil over a high heat. Add the noodles. Spread the noodles out to the edges of the pan, and then let them cook, without stirring, until they are browned on the bottom (6 to 8 minutes). Flip over and brown the other side. You can do this by placing a plate over the top of the pan, flipping the noodles out onto it and then sliding them back into the pan. You may need to add a little more oil to keep them from sticking. Cook on the second side until crispy, 4 to 5 more minutes. Remove the fried noodle pancake to a serving plate.  Cut into wedges and serve with stir fried vegetables or grilled meat. Serves 4 to 6.

 

Submitted byTony Easteron River GroveIL

WARM GINGER AND PEANUT NOODLE SALAD

1/4 cup peanut butter

1/4 cup soy sauce

1 tablespoon rice vinegar

1 tablespoon fresh lime juice

1 1/2 teaspoons sesame oil

1 teaspoon wasabi

2 teaspoons minced garlic

1/2 teaspoon ginger

1/4 teaspoon salt

1/2 pound uncooked angle hair pasta or linguini

1 1/2 cups shredded carrot

1/3 to 1/2 pound snow peas, trimmed and halved crosswise

1 cup thin strips red or yellow bell pepper

3/4 cup thinly sliced green onions

1 can sliced water chestnuts

1/2 to 3/4 cup honey roasted peanuts

 

In a large
bowl combine the peanut butter, soy sauce, vinegar, lime juice, sesame oil,
Wasabi and garlic. Whisk to combine and set aside. Cook the pasta according to
the directions on the box. When the noodles are al dente (still a little
crunchy) turn off the heat and add the carrot and snow peas. Let the mixture
sit for 2 minutes then drain, saving 1/4 cup of the liquid. Add the drained
pasta and noodles to the salad dressing in the salad bowl. Toss to coat. Add
the bell pepper, water chestnuts and onions. Toss to coat. Add the pasta water
and toss to coat. Sprinkle the honey roasted peanuts on top and serve warm.
Serves 4. This recipe can be doubled or tripled

 

SPICY CASHEW NOODLE SALAD

8 oz dried linguini, spaghetti, or soba noodles

2 cups broccoli florets cut small

1/4 pound pea pods, sliced in 1/3’s

1 carrot, peeled, julienned

1/2 red onion chopped fine

3 tablespoons sesame oil

2 to 3 teaspoons minced garlic

1 tablespoon minced fresh ginger

2 tablespoon soy sauce

3 tablespoons lime juice (fresh is best)

1/8 teaspoon cayenne

1/2 teaspoon paprika

2 tablespoon chopped fresh basil

3 green onions, sliced

1 large tomato seeded and chopped

1/2 cup red pepper, julienned

1 cup toasted cashews

 

Cook noodles according to package directions. Drain, rinse and drain again and then set it
aside. Steam the broccoli, pea pods, and carrots for about 2 minutes, making
sure they are still crisp. Rinse them in cold water and set them aside. Heat 1
tablespoon of the sesame oil in a frying pan, add onion, ginger and garlic and
saute for 2 to 3 minutes until just soft. Add the green onions, tomato and red
pepper. Mix to combine and cook for about 2 minutes. In a bowl combine the lime
juice, remaining 2 tablespoons sesame oil, soy sauce. Add the sauteed onion
mixture to the sauce and mix to combine. Add the noodles and steamed vegetables
to the sauce. Toss to coat the pasta. Refrigerate for at least 1 hour before
serving. Great at room temperature or served cold. Before serving sprinkle the
pine nuts on the top. Serves 6.

 

SALSA SHRIMP AND NOODLE SOUP

1 lb shrimp, peeled and divined

1 tablespoon lemon juice

1/4 teaspoon chili powder

1/4 teaspoon ground cumin

1/8 teaspoon black pepper

5 cups water

2 packages  flavored Ramen Noodles (use 1 packet of seasoning)

2 cups salsa

1 15 oz can black beans rinsed and drained

1 can corn

1 green onion thinly sliced

 

In a medium bowl combine the lemon juice chili powder, cumin, and pepper. Mix to combine
and add the shrimp. Toss to coat and let sit for 1/2 hour. In a large sauce pan
bring water to boil, stir in 1 ramen flavor packet, break the ramen noodles
into pieces and add them to the saucepan. Bring the liquid to a boil cook for 1
minute. Add shrimp, salsa, beans, corn, and green onion and then reduce the
soup to a simmer. Cook for 5 to 7 minutes or until the shrimp turns pink.
Serves 4.

 

Submitted by Lenore Hentz Trenton NJ

 

ASPARAGUS AND NOODLE STIR FRY

3 oz. pkg. oriental or shrimp flavor ramen noodle soup mix

1 tablespoon sesame oil

1 lb. asparagus, cut into 1″ pieces

1 red bell pepper, cut into strips

1 red onion chopped

2 teaspoons minced garlic

1 lb. sea scallops cut in half or talapia cut into pieces

1 tablespoon soy sauce

2 tablespoon lemon juice

1 teaspoon sesame oil

1/8 teaspoon hot pepper sauce

Cook and drain ramen noodles as directed on the package and set them aside. Heat 1 tablespoon sesame oil in wok or large skillet. Add the asparagus, bell pepper, onion and garlic. Stir fry for 2 to 3 minutes or until the vegetables are crisp-tender. Add the scallops and stir-fry until they are white and firm. Add the ramen seasoning packet, soy sauce, lemon juice, 1 teaspoon sesame oil and hot sauce and stir into scallop mixture. Stir in the cooked noodles. Cook for 3 or 4 minutes until everything is hot throughout. Serves 4 to 6.

Modified from about.com

 

 

Bagel Bonanza or How Not to End Up in the Emergency Room

  

Quick, think of the most dangerous item you have in your kitchen.

 

No, it’s not that meat cleaver you never use or the blowtorch you keep on hand for kashering the oven for Pesach. Surprisingly, it’s probably one of those bagels you’ve got stashed away in the freezer. Ok, now that you’ve stopped laughing you should know that there are probably more emergency room visits for those would be gourmets who’ve “slipped” and sliced open their hand while trying to cut open a bagel than all other household mishaps combined.

For those of you who live on the moon a bagel (BAY-guhl) is a doughnut-shaped yeast roll with a thick, chewy texture and a shiny crust. Bagels are boiled in water before they’re baked because the boiling reduces the starch content and creates a shiny chewy crust. A traditional water bagel is made without eggs and, because it doesn’t contain fat, is chewier than an egg bagel. The bagel (the word means bracelet in German) was the everyday bread of the Jews in Eastern Europe. It has, over the past few decades, become the most famous Jewish food in America and standard American bread. Supposedly German in origin, the bagel came into its own and took its definitive form in the Polish shtetl. Because of their shape, no beginning and no end, bagels are supposed to symbolize the eternal cycle of Jewish life. In the old days, they were supposed to be a protection against evil spirits, warding off the evil eye and bringing good luck. For these reasons they were routinely served at circumcision, when a woman was in labor and at funerals, along with hard-boiled eggs. These days we indulge ourselves just because they taste so good.

In the interest of household safety and the need to share some really great bagel recipes (not recipes on how to make bagels but, rather recipes that use them) I’m offering the following guidelines for anxiety free slicing.

 

HOW TO SLICE A BAGEL

Hold the bagel upright on a cutting surface by forming an arch (a U shape) with your thumb and fingers. Pinch the bagel firmly between the thumb and fingers and hold it against the surface. Place the sharp (make sure it’s sharp) knife inside the arch and carefully slice downward toward the table surface using a gentle but steady sawing motion. NEVER, EVER, CUT THE BAGEL BY HOLDING IT YOUR HAND AND SLICING IT TOWARD YOUR HAND!


CHEESE BAGEL BITES

 
3 plain bagels, split and toasted
1 tablespoon prepared mustard
1/3 cup mayonnaise or salad dressing
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
2 Green onions (with tops) chopped
 
Spread bagels with mustard. Mix remaining ingredients together in a bowl and then spread the mixture to the edges of bagel halves. Set the oven to broil.  Broil the prepared bagels about 5 inches from heat until topping is bubbly, about 1 minute. Cut each bagel into 6 pieces. Makes 36 appetizers;
BAGELS WITH LEMON CHICKEN AND AVOCADO SAUCE

1 lb ground chicken

1 egg

1/2 cup dry breadcrumbs

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon each pepper, oregano and paprika

1/2 teaspoon grated lemon zest

1 clove garlic, minced

4 bagels, halved

1 cup sliced mushrooms

2 tomatoes,

sliced romaine lettuce

1/2 cup pareve cream cheese

2 ripe avocados, peeled and pitted

1 clove garlic, minced

1/2 cup pareve sour cream

1/2 teaspoon Tabasco sauce

juice of 1/2 lemon

Combine the pareve cream cheese, avocado, 1 teaspoon minced garlic, Tabasco sauce, lemon juice and Tabasco sauce in a food processor and blend until smooth. Place the sauce in a bowl and refrigerate until cold. In another bowl combine the ground chicken, egg, breadcrumbs, salt, pepper, oregano, paprika, lemon zest and garlic. Mix well and shape into 4 patties about 4 inches in diameter and 3/4 inch thick. Grill the patties over on the grill or in a grill pan for about 5 minutes per side until no longer pink inside. Arrange the tomato slices then sliced mushrooms over bottom half of each bagel. Place chicken patty on top of the mushrooms and cover it with the avocado sauce and lettuce and the top of the bagel. Serves 4

TEX MEX PIZZA BAGEL
 

6 bagels, split and toasted  (jalapeno flavor is great)
3 tablespoons ready made pizza sauce
1 can (8-3/4 oz.) dark red kidney beans, drained
1 cup chopped onion
1 to 2 finely chopped jalapeno peppers (remove seeds for a milder flavor) (optional)
12 tortilla chips (white or yellow), broken up
2 cups (8 oz.) shredded Monterey Jack cheese or Mozzarella
1 tablespoon chili powder

Preheat oven to 425. Spoon 1-1/2 teaspoon pizza sauce on each bagel half. Evenly top each bagel half with beans onion, jalapeno pepper, tortilla chips and cheese. Sprinkle with chili powder. Bake 12 to 15 minutes or until cheese is melted and is heated through. Makes 12 halves.

TOMATO BASIL BAGEL BRUSCHETTA

1 tablespoon olive oil
1/4 cup seeded and diced ripe tomato
2 tablespoon shredded fresh basil leaves
Pinch of salt
1 bagel (garlic, onion or plain), split
1 clove of garlic, peeled and halved lengthwise

In a bowl combine the oil, tomato, basil and salt. Let the mixture stand for 15 minutes. Toast the bagel in the toaster or under the broiler. While the bagel is still hot, rub the cut surface with the garlic. Spoon the tomato mixture on top. Eat at once. Makes 1 bagel. This can be multiplied as many times as you like
The traditional bagel sandwich USUALLY consists of cream cheese, lox, a slice of onion and a slice of tomato. However, bagel sandwiches are so popular these days that bagel shops often have 15 or 20 varieties to choose from and probably 40 or 50 sandwich variations on their menus. Here, courtesy of Philadelphia Cream Company are some really simple (and delicious) ways to make a quick and easy bagel snack.
Strawberry Banana Crunch: Spread strawberry cream cheese on a toasted bagel. Top with banana slices; sprinkle with granola.

Banana Split: Spread cream cheese on a toasted bagel. Top with banana slices; sprinkle with peanuts. Drizzle with strawberry preserves.

Apple Cinnamon: Spread cream cheese on a toasted bagel. Top with apple slices and raisins. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar.

Peach Melba: Spread cream cheese on a toasted bagel. Top with peach slices; drizzle with raspberry preserves.

Apple Cinnamon Praline: apple cinnamon cream cheese on a toasted bagel. Sprinkle with toasted pecans; drizzle with maple syrup.

Health & Nut: Spread vegetable cream cheese on a toasted whole wheat bagel. sprinkle with raisins and toasted sunflower seeds.

Tropical: Spread pineapple cream cheese on a toasted bagel. Top with toasted coconut and almonds or macadamia nuts. 

Quick, think of the most dangerous item you have in your kitchen.

 

No, it’s not that meat cleaver you never use or the blowtorch you keep on hand for kashering the oven for Pesach. Surprisingly, it’s probably one of those bagels you’ve got stashed away in the freezer. Ok, now that you’ve stopped laughing you should know that there are probably more emergency room visits for those would be gourmets who’ve “slipped” and sliced open their hand while trying to cut open a bagel than all other household mishaps combined.

For those of you who live on the moon a bagel (BAY-guhl) is a doughnut-shaped yeast roll with a thick, chewy texture and a shiny crust. Bagels are boiled in water before they’re baked because the boiling reduces the starch content and creates a shiny chewy crust. A traditional water bagel is made without eggs and, because it doesn’t contain fat, is chewier than an egg bagel. The bagel (the word means bracelet in German) was the everyday bread of the Jews in Eastern Europe. It has, over the past few decades, become the most famous Jewish food in America and standard American bread. Supposedly German in origin, the bagel came into its own and took its definitive form in the Polish shtetl. Because of their shape, no beginning and no end, bagels are supposed to symbolize the eternal cycle of Jewish life. In the old days, they were supposed to be a protection against evil spirits, warding off the evil eye and bringing good luck. For these reasons they were routinely served at circumcision, when a woman was in labor and at funerals, along with hard-boiled eggs. These days we indulge ourselves just because they taste so good.

In the interest of household safety and the need to share some really great bagel recipes (not recipes on how to make bagels but, rather recipes that use them) I’m offering the following guidelines for anxiety free slicing.

 

HOW TO SLICE A BAGEL

 

Hold the bagel upright on a cutting surface by forming an arch (a U shape) with your thumb and fingers. Pinch the bagel firmly between the thumb and fingers and hold it against the surface. Place the sharp (make sure it’s sharp) knife inside the arch and carefully slice downward toward the table surface using a gentle but steady sawing motion. NEVER, EVER, CUT THE BAGEL BY HOLDING IT YOUR HAND AND SLICING IT TOWARD YOUR HAND!


CHEESE BAGEL BITES
 

 
3 plain bagels, split and toasted
1 tablespoon prepared mustard
1/3 cup mayonnaise or salad dressing
1/4 cup grated Parmesan cheese
1/4 teaspoon garlic powder
2 Green onions (with tops) chopped
 
Spread bagels with mustard. Mix remaining ingredients together in a bowl and then spread the mixture to the edges of bagel halves. Set the oven to broil.  Broil the prepared bagels about 5 inches from heat until topping is bubbly, about 1 minute. Cut each bagel into 6 pieces. Makes 36 appetizers;


BAGELS WITH LEMON CHICKEN AND AVOCADO SAUCE

 

1 lb ground chicken

1 egg

1/2 cup dry breadcrumbs

1 teaspoon salt

1/2 teaspoon each pepper, oregano and paprika

1/2 teaspoon grated lemon zest

1 clove garlic, minced

4 bagels, halved

1 cup sliced mushrooms

2 tomatoes,

sliced romaine lettuce

1/2 cup pareve cream cheese

2 ripe avocados, peeled and pitted

1 clove garlic, minced

1/2 cup pareve sour cream

1/2 teaspoon Tabasco sauce

juice of 1/2 lemon

 

Combine the pareve cream cheese, avocado, 1 teaspoon minced garlic, Tabasco sauce, lemon juice and Tabasco sauce in a food processor and blend until smooth. Place the sauce in a bowl and refrigerate until cold. In another bowl combine the ground chicken, egg, breadcrumbs, salt, pepper, oregano, paprika, lemon zest and garlic. Mix well and shape into 4 patties about 4 inches in diameter and 3/4 inch thick. Grill the patties over on the grill or in a grill pan for about 5 minutes per side until no longer pink inside. Arrange the tomato slices then sliced mushrooms over bottom half of each bagel. Place chicken patty on top of the mushrooms and cover it with the avocado sauce and lettuce and the top of the bagel. Serves 4

TEX MEX PIZZA BAGEL
 

6 bagels, split and toasted  (jalapeno flavor is great)
3 tablespoons ready made pizza sauce
1 can (8-3/4 oz.) dark red kidney beans, drained
1 cup chopped onion
1 to 2 finely chopped jalapeno peppers (remove seeds for a milder flavor) (optional)
12 tortilla chips (white or yellow), broken up
2 cups (8 oz.) shredded Monterey Jack cheese or Mozzarella
1 tablespoon chili powder

 

Preheat oven to 425. Spoon 1-1/2 teaspoon pizza sauce on each bagel half. Evenly top each bagel half with beans onion, jalapeno pepper, tortilla chips and cheese. Sprinkle with chili powder. Bake 12 to 15 minutes or until cheese is melted and is heated through. Makes 12 halves.

 

TOMATO BASIL BAGEL BRUSCHETTA

1 tablespoon olive oil
1/4 cup seeded and diced ripe tomato
2 tablespoon shredded fresh basil leaves
Pinch of salt
1 bagel (garlic, onion or plain), split
1 clove of garlic, peeled and halved lengthwise

In a bowl combine the oil, tomato, basil and salt. Let the mixture stand for 15 minutes. Toast the bagel in the toaster or under the broiler. While the bagel is still hot, rub the cut surface with the garlic. Spoon the tomato mixture on top. Eat at once. Makes 1 bagel. This can be multiplied as many times as you like


The traditional bagel sandwich USUALLY consists of cream cheese, lox, a slice of onion and a slice of tomato. However, bagel sandwiches are so popular these days that bagel shops often have 15 or 20 varieties to choose from and probably 40 or 50 sandwich variations on their menus. Here, courtesy of Philadelphia Cream Company are some really simple (and delicious) ways to make a quick and easy bagel snack.


Strawberry Banana Crunch: Spread strawberry cream cheese on a toasted bagel. Top with banana slices; sprinkle with granola.

 

Banana Split: Spread cream cheese on a toasted bagel. Top with banana slices; sprinkle with peanuts. Drizzle with strawberry preserves.

Apple Cinnamon:

Spread cream cheese on a toasted bagel. Top with apple slices and raisins. Sprinkle with cinnamon sugar.

Peach Melba: Spread cream cheese on a toasted bagel. Top with peach slices; drizzle with raspberry preserves.

Apple Cinnamon Praline: apple cinnamon cream cheese on a toasted bagel. Sprinkle with toasted pecans; drizzle with maple syrup.

Health & Nut: Spread vegetable cream cheese on a toasted whole wheat bagel. sprinkle with raisins and toasted sunflower seeds.

Tropical: Spread pineapple cream cheese on a toasted bagel. Top with toasted coconut and almonds or macadamia nuts.

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